Focus Remains on Retirement Instead of Training for Over 50s

Focus Remains on Retirement, Instead of Training for Over 50s

It seems that even though over 50s are still as vibrant and determined in the work place as they have ever been, companies are more set on planning their retirement than their future within their organizations. A research study was recently conducted to see whether over 50s are being managed effectively within the workplace, and it seems that there is a definite divide between what they want, and what they are getting in their place of work.

Focusing on Retirement

What is it that over 50s are looking for in the workplace? The answer is simple – training. Just like any other employee, over 50s are looking for ways to continue to improve upon their skills, so that they have better, brighter futures within the company they work for. While these individuals are shooting for the stars, it seems that HR departments have been focusing on their retirements.

Benefits for the Company

What makes the focus on retirement all the more disappointing is that research has actually indicated that investing in the baby boomer generation could be beneficial for businesses. It is not only how this generation of individuals is being directed that might be disheartening, but also how they are valued within businesses around the nation.

The study indicated that not only are the baby boomers motivated and ambitious, but they are also determine to continue growing in their roles in the workforce. Out of the 2,000 individuals who were surveyed, the message was clear – baby boomers are most certainly not obsolete in the work place.

Catering to their Needs

The figures have shown that while the over 50s are determined to continue to grow professionally, only 1% of the surveyed HR staff members believed that their over 50s workforce required any sort of career development. This is clearly a mismatch between what they are expecting, and what their workforce is relying on them for. It seems that HR departments are more concerned with developing the potential of the younger employees. The old belief that having baby boomers remain in management positions will stop younger employees from working their way up the career ladder is incorrect, according to the experts, because having many generations share in experience and knowledge could actually benefit businesses.

The older generation should be motivating younger employees, and when they lack enthusiasm and drive, this actually impacts everyone below them.

The Future of Business

It seems as though companies throughout Britain have some thinking to do about how they are supporting their over 50s staff, as well as how this could be impacting everything from their work force to their brand image.

4 comments

  • Diane Lane

    I must say, I’ve also noticed this trend. I’m seeing and hearing about frustration of middle aged and older workers still in the workplace for this reason. I think in some, if not a lot of cases, I believe it’s due to younger people being in management positions. It seems many of them have less respect for those older than themselves, and don’t seem to value what older workers have to offer the company. I think much of this is due to a disconnect and lack of communication. Perhaps they feel uncomfortable dealing with those who are older and make incorrect assumptions based on their unfamiliarity with them. Regardless, I feel this attitude and practice hurts not only the older workers, but also the company, so hopefully the issue will be brought to light, and subsequently rectified.

  • 55andAmbitious

    At my husband’s workplace working with IT professionals, in the managerial roles, he says that, they prefer to employ (about higher percentage chance) of hiring the older and the experienced. Ones whom they can train with little, or no further training and investment and time. They’d hire professionals who have the grasp of the line of work they do. Before he got the job, he had been unemployed for 9 months. But in the interview, he, at 59, apparently gained the company’s favor because of his experiences tucked in his treasure chest., ready to shine and be a part of the company. Which was really good news and wonderful to think about and behold up to now!. :-)

    Retirement isn’t in his plan at the moment. He loves his job immensely. He loves the on-the-job-training, as well. The fact that he is working, is useful, and generating positively for the economy, and providing for his family.

    I think everyone in our over 50s can make things happen productively, and not focused on the retirement mindset.

  • Kate

    I have noticed this as well… in some local industries it’s true and they’re just not doing anything to keep or train older workers… in fact, it *does* seem as if they’re trying to elbow them out slowly. I happen to think that it will backfire because I’ve seen the caliber of many of the younger workers they’re bringing in… it simply doesn’t work to push things through fast and constantly look for shortcuts just to get finished… it results in shoddy work!

    On the other hand, I do know of some places that are doing the complete opposite and actively seeking more mature employees for this very reason. I think that the over 50s who can get into those companies are the lucky ones indeed!

  • 55andlovingit

    This is so frustrating. A friend of mine was just made redundant because her workplace wanted fresher, newer blood. Nevermind all the hard work she put in for 20 years and her loyalty. It seems it was decided that she was getting paid too much and the cost to retrain her for the new roles in the company would have been a waste.

    Do these companies think that everyone is rolling in the dough and can afford to retire? Some older people need these jobs!

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