Watch Out Over 50’s – 2016 is Your Year

Watch Out Over 50’s – 2016 is Your Year

There are few things that terrify a woman more than the thought of ageing, and according to a survey conducted as recently as 2012, it seems that women in Britain actually feel invisible by the time they turn 46…never mind over 50.

In recent years, there has been a push to recognise and even stamp out ageism in Hollywood, which let’s face it, is a major trend setter for the rest of the world. While progress has been made over the years, it seems that 2016 might finally be the year that woman say goodbye to the stigma surrounding a woman who turns 50.

Bringing Ageism to Light

It is important to talk about ageism and the stigma surrounding women in their 50’s because it brings to light the stark difference between what many people believe, and what science says about someone at this age. For example, it is believes that it is around their mid 40’s that women begin to really age and lose their looks, but according to ageing expert Sir Muir Gray, ageing isn’t actually a problem until someone enters their 90’s. He believes that ageing is truly just a state of mind, and it’s high time that everyone else follows suit.

As Gray states, the fact that so many people “feel their age” at a much younger age has more to do with society’s pessimistic view on ageing, and once this is internalized, people begin to reflect these views back to society.

Hollywood, the Ultimate Trend Setter

As Hollywood begins to age, people’s views on ageing will be forced to change, especially as people see some of their favourite actresses and models turn 50. By continuing to lead fulfilling careers, bare children and even go on world tours, celebrities are helping women throughout the world challenge their own perceptions of ageing, and what this means for them.

In an interesting study conducted by Spring Chicken, it was found that people in their 50’s actually live in a very similar way to people in their 30’s. This certainly puts the theory to rest that people need to “get old” at a certain age, and begin “acting their age”. It seems that the pace of people’s lives don’t slow once they age, and they still lead active social and professional lives. With famous names like Salma Hayek, Cindy Crawford and Alan Davies turning 50 in 2016, it will certainly be easier for the rest of us to follow suit.

6 comments

  • Diane Lane

    I think this is a timely issue. I have noticed over the past few years that television and print ads are showing more middle-aged women as the primary actors, rather than simply being depicted in the background, as grandmotherly figures. I’m also seeing more advertisements showing middle-aged and even elderly people engaged in physical activity, which didn’t used to be the case. I think the article is correct, that as our favorite actors age and we age along with them, we expect to continue to see them playing active roles in the field. It used to seem that once an actress turned 40, she was dropped in favor of someone younger, while the males were still working well into their seventies and beyond. I hope 2016 is the year that we see major improvements, and physical looks become de-emphasized, in favor of substance.

  • 55andAmbitious

    I like the ‘futuristic’ title to which you’ve introduced your curious readers, such as I. It came to me as , “Watch out, 2016, here I come!” It had been three years ago, approaching four in a month, that I felt a little intimidated by the golden number 50 attached to my age.

    As I turned 50, I really felt I hadn’t left my youth, for menopause hadn’t teased me to “feel my age of aging”, until 53. So, these 3 years have been good many chapters of Life Over 50 years.

    No, we do not need to feel the brunt of oldness and “acting our age” just because we’re in our fifties. I admire what Hollywood–the world of glamour and excitement, have powerful influences on the world on how to handle ageism,

    I have actually welcomed 2016 as another year– not to get old– but to grow old with grace and beauty. :-)

  • I look at it like every year is my year, but I do feel this year may be one of the best yet since I hit the 50 mark in 2014. Each year brings new insights in health and wellness, which seems to help slow down the natural aging process quite a bit.

    One thing that definitely makes a difference is MIND SET. The moment I stopped thinking and saying “Wow…. I’m old.” I stopped feeling that way. In fact now when people find out how ‘old’ I am, they say “Wow, really ?” And they truly have a shocked look on their face.

    It’s never to late to dream bigger and start new adventures.

  • Sue Tobias

    “it was found that people in their 50’s actually live in a very similar way to people in their 30’s” – no! Really? Of course they do!! The only difference I’ve found is that the face looking back at me in the mirror looks different. I still kick leaves and jump in puddles. I still wear jeans and T-shirts. And I have every intention of continuing to do so and advise you to do the same! You are as old as you feel. If you don;t tell people your age, they won’t even think about it, and will accept you as being as old as you behave.

  • Kate

    Well now! I say “it’s about time!” It went on for far too long allowing Hollywood to basically invalidate women over 50 (or maybe even over 40) and I’m glad to hear that it will be changing even more.

    I was just thinking this morning that one of the things keeping me young in mind, heart, and spirit is my joy of learning. I will never want to stop learning new things, so I realize it’s a great way to be keeping my mind sharp even as I enter the 60s, 70s, and beyond.

    I’ve always thought that “getting old” was entirely determined by our attitude… glad to see that more and more people and groups (especially the trend setters in Hollywood!) are starting to agree! :-D

  • This year I will hit the 55 year mark. For some reason that number seems a bit unreal. I work with many younger people in their twenties and thirties and never feel older them when we interact, however, I’ve recently begun to wonder how they perceive me. Is age now going to stand in the way of employment opportunities? I feel great and my health is much better than it was in my twenties thanks to lifestyle changes. I try to remember to be grateful for the present and my good health. After all, one day I will look back and remember these as my “younger years”.

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